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On the video game Team Fortress 2, it has built up its own in-game economy, even branching out into other video games. But, for a reason that I can not find an answer to, the games economy started to alter greatly. The value of Keys (an important currency in the in-game economy) started to rise in value, dramatically. So far, their price has gotten 7 times bigger than what it started it (give or a take) and is still climbing. I would like to ask a question on this site regarding it, but I wanted to make sure that it would be allowed here.

I tried asking the Meta for the site I planned on asking it on, but the people who responded to it said that it would be better off here instead, and it would likely be closed there.

Link to Meta question on Gaming SE

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Absolutely virtual economies are on topic.

It's a very interesting area of study, and that it's taking place virtually, means that an abundance of data collection can allow for creation of models that can apply to real world economies.

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Virtual economies, computational economics, simulations, are definitely on topic here. Nevertheless, I suspect that what you are after is the economic laws that should hold/take effect so that what you observe in the game should happen. This essentially means, that the issue is not about the software, or about anything computational, really:

You will have to somehow describe adequately this virtual society/economy, in many aspects (like who is issuing currency, is it monitored, does it have limits etc). An important detail: is "Keys" the official currency of the game, or is it a tradable/exchangeable asset?. Do you earn Keys by accomplishing feats or you can buy them by, say, charging you real-world credit card? Things like that.

Before the dramatic rise of their price, how and why did their price fluctuate?

Also, what kind of economic transactions take place in the game? And how?

These are not to be posted here, but on the main site.

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